reproducibility

SmartFlare controversy: independent confirmation of endosomal localization

Check this previous post for a quick summary of the SmartFlare controversy, or read all SmartFlare-related posts if you are really passionate.

At the centre of the SmartFlare controversy is the rather simple question, from an experimental point of view, of how many Spherical Nucleic Acids (to use Chad Mirkin’s terminology), if any, escape the endosomal pathway.

In contradiction with Chad Mirkin’s many peer reviewed articles and EMD Millipore marketing material, we concluded (Mason et al, 2016) that the Spherical Nucleic Acids do not escape endosomes and do not detect cytosolic mRNAs.

A few days ago, Sven Budik et al, an Austrian group published their evaluation of the SmartFlare in the context of equine embryo development. They write: “In all positive cells,
regardless of whether they occurred in equine conceptus, trophoblastic vesicle or fibroblast cell culture, the fluorescence signal showed a spotted pattern that is in accordance with the observations of Mason et al. (2016).

They also used electron microscopy to look at the intracellular localization of the particles. Here is the relevant part of their discussion and conclusion (emphasis mine):

The present study indicates that the intracellular process of nanogold particle uptake is endocytic and endosomal with a lysosomal sorting after longer incubation periods. This finding is in agreement with results from HeLa cells in vitro (Gilleron et al. 2013). Similarly, nanoparticles injected intravenously were taken up by endocytosis and later
clustered in lysosomes primarily in macrophages (Sadauskas et al. 2007). The incorporation time of lipid nanoparticlecontaining short interfering RNA gold particles in HeLa cells was similar (Gilleron et al. 2013) to that demonstrated in equine trophoblast vesicles in the present study. Accumulation of SmartFlare probes in residual bodies may be a consequence of increased stability of the immobilised oligonucleotides adjacent to the nanogold particles due to enhanced nuclease resistance (Rosi et al. 2006). In accordance with the results of Mason et al. (2016), we observed no or very few nanogold particles free in the cytoplasm, confirming a primarily endosomal and lysosomal localisation.

This observation raises the question how a specific SmartFlare probe is able to detect its target mRNA located in the cytoplasm. One possible explanation for the generation of lysosome-located specific fluorescence signals by SmartFlare probes could be the existence of specific RNA sequences imported for subsequent degradation into lysosomes (Fujiwara et al. 2013). Further studies using qRT-PCR investigating the isolated lysosomal fraction before and after incubation with specific SmartFlare probes are necessary to confirm this hypothesis. An 18S RNA nano-flare probe had a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on porcine fetal fibroblasts (Fu et al. 2016). In contrast, no cytotoxic effects or changes in morphology after incorporation of antisense oligonucleotide nanogold particles in a mouse endothelial cell line were observed by Rosi et al. (2006). In addition, in the present study, there was no evidence that incubation with the SmartFlare probes had a toxic effect on the equine cells tested, even at higher concentrations. This is in accordance with the results of Pan et al. (2009) demonstrating that 15-nm gold particles have only low cytotoxic effects compared with the detrimental effects of small 1.4-nm gold particles.

In conclusion, SmartFlare probes pass into early equine conceptuses at stages used for embryo transfer, as well as trophoblast vesicles and cells cultured in vitro. In these early ZP equine conceptuses, the time frame (.5 and ,24 h) for SmartFlare uptake would be suitable for practical applications in commercial embryo transfer programs. Therefore, these probes are suggested to be applicable to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis before transfer of these conceptuses to the recipient.

In summary, the authors’ results are entirely consistent with our observations. They conclude, quite reasonably, that if SmartFlares detect mRNAs whilst being in endosomes, they cannot directly detect cytosolic mRNAs. This is in direct contradiction with Mirkin et al and EMD Millipore. Then, they propose that if the SmartFlares work, they maybe detect mRNAs which are in endosomes. This an interesting hypothesis that will require further study and is very different from anything published by Mirkin and EMD Millipore (the relevant reference is here). Since Budik et al do not provide any evidence that the SmartFlares actually detect mRNAs in the first place, maybe a simpler explanation is that the SmartFlares signal is unspecific and result from the probe degradation by nucleases in endosomes.