Mirkin

References for my talk at Gold 2018

Update: the slides are available (here: gold2018-Levy2) and there is a recording of a few minutes here.

Slide 1:

Slide 2: Nanotech is bs Tweet.

Slide 3: Calling Bullshit.

Slide 4:  Dinosaur. (from here)

Slide 5: Electron microscopy of Hela cells after the ingestion of colloidal gold; C.G. Harford, A. Hamlin, and E. Parker; 1957

Slide 6: The entry and distribution of herpes virus and colloidal gold in Hela cells after contact in suspension; M. A. Epstein, K. Hummeler, and A. Berkaloff; 1963

Slide 7:

Slide 8: The spherical nucleic acid paradox; D. Mason, G. Carolan, M. Held, J. Comenge, S. Cowman, and R. Lévy; 2015

Slide 9: Excerpt from email (shared with permission).

Slide 10:  Evaluation of SmartFlare probe applicability for verification of RNAs in early equine conceptuses, equine dermal fibroblast cells and trophoblastic vesicles;  S. Budik, W. Tschulenk, S. Kummer, I. Walter, and C. Aurich; 2017

Slide 11: SmartFlares fail to reflect their target transcripts levels; M. Czarnek and J. Bereta; 2017

Slide 12: Calcium-Binding Proteins S100A8 and S100A9: Investigation of Their Immune Regulatory Effect in Myeloid Cells; J. Yang, J. Anholts, U. Kolbe, J.A. Stegehuis-Kamp, F.H.J. Claas and M. Eikmans

Slide 13: SmartFlare catalog.

Slide 14:

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The great answer to people saying that #preprints are not peer-reviewed

That perfect title is courtesy of (see tweet below)

On Monday (25/06), we will publish a preprint about the spherical nucleic acid technology. Our paper was prompted by the publication in Nature Biomedical Engineering of “Abnormal scar identification with spherical-nucleic-acid technology” by Yeo et al.

The great answer is… review them! I issued a call to review our preprint before it comes out and I have now sent the article to a number of colleagues across the world. I am very much looking forward to their comments good or bad. The comments will be posted on PubPeer. If you have some time on your hands this Friday or over the weekend to look at the paper, drop me an email and I will also send you a preview copy.

Yeo et al corresponding authors were provided with a copy of our preprint two weeks ago but unfortunately they have not responded. I hope they will post comments on PubPeer. We are planning to subsequently submit a version (hopefully improved thanks to the comments) to Nature Biomedical Engineering. It is however sometime rather difficult to debate the scientific literature through the official channels of traditional journals so this route via preprint will accelerate this important discussion.

 

Mind-boggling plagiarism of this blog

In January 2015, someone went to the effort of creating a fake raphazlab blog as the stripy nanoparticles controversy was descending from a scientific debate into the gutters of online discussions.

Fast forward three years. The Spherical Nucleic Acids controversy is slowly heating up. Chad Mirkin continues to win prizes after prizes, but he is unseemly asked to comment on the failing SmartFlare technology (the commercial name of the Spherical Nucleic Acids) by Dalmeet Singh writing for Chemistry World.

Dalmeet writes:

But Chad Mirkin, a chemist at Northwestern University in the US, who developed the precursor to SmartFlares, nanoflares, pointed Chemistry World to more than 30 papers, which, he says, have successfully used the technology.

Chemistry World contacted a number of groups that have used SmartFlares. Hirendranath Banerjee, a molecular biologist at Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina, describes SmartFlares as a ‘very novel and effective technique’, noting that it has been helpful in evaluating gene expression experiments in his lab.2

Now comes the mind-boggling part.

The introduction of Hirendranath’s paper (reference 2 above) is largely plagiarized… from this very blog. From the very first SmartFlare post on this blog, entitled How smart are the SmartFlares?

Below, is an excerpt from my post with, in red, the sentences that reference 2 copied.

RNA molecules play crucial roles in cells such as coding, decoding, regulation, and expression of genes, yet they are much more difficult to study. SmartFlares are nanoparticle-based probes for the detection and imaging of RNA in live cells. Could they become the GFP of the RNA world?

 Many certainly believe this to be the case. SmartFlare ranked second in TheScientist top ten 2013 innovations, with one of the judges, Kevin Lustig, commenting “These new RNA detection probes can be used to visualize RNA expression in live cells at the single-cell level.”  The following year, SmartFlare won an R&D100 award. The technology comes from Chad Mirkin’s lab at Northwestern University. Chad Mirkin is the winner of numerous prestigious prizes and a science adviser to the President of the United States. The scientific articles introducing the SmartFlare concept (under the name of Nano-Flare) were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society in 2007, ACS Nano in 2009, etc. In 2013, the SmartFlare technology was licensed to EMD Millipore. Here is one of their promotional video:

For a molecular sensor to work, it needs a detection mechanism. The principle of the SmartFlare is explained from 0:45. A capture oligonucleotide (i.e. DNA) is bound to the gold nanoparticles. A reporter strand is bound to the capture strand. The reporter strand carries a fluorophore but that fluorophore does not emit light because it is too close to the gold (the fluorescence is “quenched”). In the presence of the target RNA, the reporter strand is replaced by the target RNA and therefore released, quenching stops, and fluorescence is detected.

This is plagiarism, with, in addition, a clear intent to deceive: whilst the article entire point appears to be the celebration of the SmartFlare technology, e.g concluding sentence (Thus Smart Flare novel gold nanoparticles could revolutionize the field of differential gene expression studies and drug discovery), the 2015 blog post was already doubting the validity of the technology.
I wrote to the Editor of the Journal who said that they would evaluate the claims and take some form of action. I contacted Hirendra Banerjee who declined to provide a statement; instead he issued a legal threat against the publication of this post.
Meanwhile, on Twitter
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Conclusion of this exchange?
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Guest post: SmartFlares fail to reflect their target transcripts levels

Czarnek&BeretaThis is a guest post by Maria Czarnek and Joanna Bereta, who have just published the following article in Scientific Reports entitled SmartFlares fail to reflect their target transcripts levels

We got the idea of using SmartFlare probes when working on generating knockout cells. In the era of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, the possibility of sorting out knockout cells based on their low target transcript content (mRNAs that contain premature stop codons are removed in a process called nonsense-mediated decay) instead of time-consuming testing of dozens or thousands of clones would be a great step forward. SmartFlare probes seemed to be just the ticket: no transfection, lysis or fixation needed; moreover, the probes were supposed to eventually leave the cells. We were full of hope as the first probes arrived. (more…)

A RESPONSE FROM CHAD MIRKIN’S GROUP [follow up #1/n]

Some readers might wonder why I am going on about this, so let me tell you: this is a considerably more important story than Stripy Nanoparticles Revisited. If, as I am arguing, some of this science is shaky, then it is not only the way we evaluate scientists and spend public money which are put into question, but the foundation of ongoing clinical trials.

Back to basics: in the section of Mirkin’s group PhD dissertation (previous post) that respond to our critique of their work on Spherical Nucleic Acid / SmartFlare / StickyFlare, they wrote the following:

Additionally, since the commercialization and sale of the nanoflare platform under the trade name Smartflare (Millipore), dozens of researchers around the world have participated in successful sequence-specific gene detection.[80]

Reference [80] correspond to six (half a dozen) articles, 80a to 80f (see below for details and links). Out of these six, only two are actual research papers, and, for both, the SmartFlares are a very minor addition to the work. Out of these two, only one is completely independent of Mirkin/EMD Millipore (the other one comes from Northwestern).

80a) is not primary research; it is an advertorial produced by EMD Millipore.

80b) is not primary research: it is a 300 words congress abstract (no figure). A follow up paper by the same group is discussed here.

80c) is a review and it is a collaboration between Northwestern (Mirkin’s University) and EMD Millipore. CoI statement from the paper: “D. Weldon is the R&D Manager at EMD Millipore responsible for the production of SmartFlares. Patents related to therapeutically targeting Nodal in tumor cells have been awarded to E.A. Seftor, R.E.B. Seftor, and M.J.C. Hendrix.

80d) is a research paper. It does not show in any way that SmartFlares work. It assumes it does. The SmartFlare is a minor part of the article.

80e) is not primary research: it is an advertorial in a magazine funded by company advertising (including EMD Millipore in that very issue). The author is a journalist working for the magazine, not a practicing scientist.

80f) is a research paper. It does not show in any way that SmartFlares work. It assumes it does. SmartFlares are a very minor part of the article. The authors are from Northwestern, i.e. Mirkin’s University.

 

A response from Chad Mirkin’s group

Well nearly. Possibly as close as we might get.

If you have followed the Spherical Nucleic Acid / SmartFlare / StickyFlare story on this blog, you will know that we have raised doubts about the endosomal escape of these nanoparticles which are supposed to reach the cytosol of cells where they could detect mRNAs. We have even published an article on this topic. The Mirkin group has developed the technology and it has been commercialized four years ago for the live cell detection of mRNAs by EMD Millipore.

One PNAS paper on the topic was Briley et al (see here for letter to PNAS and what happened to that letter). In his PhD dissertation (Briley, W. E. (2016), William Edward Briley respond to our criticism. I reproduce the relevant section below. One might note that there is an incredibly simple way to determine the localisation of these particles inside the cells: electron microscopy, a technique which has been used for this exact purpose for over 50 years. We have used it. The results were unambiguous.

2.3 Commentary on the Endosomal Escape of SNAs
Though the endosomal escape of SNA nanostructures such as the Nanoflare and stickyflare is evident based upon their ability to provide sequence-specific information regarding RNA levels and locations within cells, one researcher has concluded that SNAs cannot escape from endosomes.[75] That researcher [That’s me!] is ignoring the many papers now that use such architectures for sequence-specific cell-sorting experiments. Indeed, if these architectures, which are taken up by scavenger-receptor mediated endosomal pathways,[68a] do not escape the endosome, then it is difficult to understand the reports by the many groups who have documented the sequencespecific function of SNAs (all of which require endosomal escape), in antisense gene regulation,[12, 44-45, 53] siRNA gene regulation,[20, 68b, 76] nanoflare gene detection,[47, 67a, 67c, 77] and sticky-flare gene detection.[78] Perhaps the best demonstration of this sequence specificity is in the function of the multiplexed Nanoflare.[67a] This nanoconjugate, discussed in chapter 1, contains two targeting sequences specific to two different genes (actin and survivin). When cells treated with multiplexed nanoflares were subjected to siRNA that specifically knocked down the expression of survivin, a corresponding decrease of fluorescence was observed in the nanoflare’s survivin-associated fluorescence (cy5), but not the actin-associated fluorescence (cy3) compared to control.[67a] Likewise, when cells were subjected to actin-targeting siRNA, a decrease in actin-associated fluorescence was observed, with no decrease of survivin-associated fluorescence.
These results indicate that the detection by nanoflares is unique to the targeted mRNA transcript. To rule out any possible effects of the fluorophores, the Cy5 and Cy3 dyes were switched to the other gene (actin-cy5, survivin-cy3), and again the corresponding sequence-specific responses were observed. Importantly, since the development of the multiplexed nanoflare, other research groups have independently developed nanoflare-like structures capable of sequence-specific detection of 3,[57] and even 4[79] genes simultaneously. Additionally, since the commercialization and sale of the nanoflare platform under the trade name Smartflare (Millipore), dozens of researchers around the world have participated in successful sequence-specific gene detection.[80]
Further evidence of SNA endosome escape can be seen visually through analysis of the sticky-flare construct. If sticky-flares were incapable of escaping endosomes, one would expect consistent colocalization with endosomes. However, this is not the case. The patterns of β-actin targeted sticky-flares, when used in HeLa cells, instead exhibit localization around mitochondria. If such structures were limited to endosomes, it is inconceivable that they would co-localize with specific organelles. This is consistent with mitochondrial localization of multiple RNAs which
has also been identified by other groups, using multiple techniques, in HeLa cells.[74] Sticky-flare release from the endosome was further confirmed by designing sticky-flares targeting a second sequence, a U1 short nuclear RNA (snRNA). U1 snRNA is known to traffic from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Indeed, cells treated with U1-targeting sticky-flares exhibited specific fluorescence within the nucleus. The pattern observed indicates nuclear localization through endosomal escape and sequence-specific tagging of an RNA that is actively transported into the nucleus. Again, this would not be possible if such structures were confined exclusively to endosomes. Speculation that SNAs do not escape endosomes has been fueled by the observation that the fluorescence pattern of β-actin in MEFs is punctate, which has been interpreted as an indication that the sticky-flares are simply trapped in endosomes. However, β-actin is well known to exhibit punctate fluorescence in many cases, an observation made by others in multiple cell lines, including MEFs.[81] Punctate fluorescence is very common in RNA-labeling studies and well known by researchers familiar with FISH.82 This is due to the fact that RNA is often packaged into large RNA-containing granules, which facilitates transport and translational control of the included transcripts.[82b, 83] Such packaging into granules has been extensively studied using β-actin mRNA. Thus, the fact that sticky-flares targeting β-actin were packaged into granules as previously observed, while U1-targeting sticky-flares were specific to the nucleus in the same cell line, demonstrates the functionality of the construct.
Taken together, the success of the many groups who use flare architectures for the detection and knockdown of RNA in cells, and the work of dozens of labs studying related nanoparticle constructs, provide unambiguous evidence of the ability for such architectures to escape the endosome and participate in reactions exclusive to the cytosol. The mechanism of endosomal escape for nanoparticle-based vehicles is currently unknown and is an interesting and important question that is actively being investigated by many in the field.[84]

ref2ref3

Briley, W. E. (2016). Investigation and manipulation of the local microenvironment of spherical nucleic acid nanoconjugates (Order No. 10117274). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1795522748). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1795522748?accountid=12117

Chad Mirkin on Nano Hype

Chad Mirkin did a Reddit AMA yesterday (h/t Neil Withers).

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(highlight mine)

Of these 1800 commercial products, 1700+ are in fact a single product, the famous Spherical Nucleic Acids/SmartFlares.

More on this blog and our paper (The spherical nucleic acids mRNA detection paradox) here.

With the risk of being accused of having cynical views…