gold nanoparticles

Guest post: SmartFlares fail to reflect their target transcripts levels

Czarnek&BeretaThis is a guest post by Maria Czarnek and Joanna Bereta, who have just published the following article in Scientific Reports entitled SmartFlares fail to reflect their target transcripts levels

We got the idea of using SmartFlare probes when working on generating knockout cells. In the era of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, the possibility of sorting out knockout cells based on their low target transcript content (mRNAs that contain premature stop codons are removed in a process called nonsense-mediated decay) instead of time-consuming testing of dozens or thousands of clones would be a great step forward. SmartFlare probes seemed to be just the ticket: no transfection, lysis or fixation needed; moreover, the probes were supposed to eventually leave the cells. We were full of hope as the first probes arrived. (more…)

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How to Elucidate the Structure of Peptide Monolayers on Gold Nanoparticles?

I have recently submitted my PhD thesis and we have now pre-printed on bioRxiv the work constituting its major chapter. Together with the pre-print, the data have been made publicly available in an online repository of the University of Liverpool. Well isn’t it perfect timing that this week is open access week? 😉

This work has been conducted nearly entirely during the 2 years of my PhD spent at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE) and at the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing (IHPC) in Singapore.

In this study, peptide-capped gold nanoparticles are considered, which offer the possibility of combining the optical properties of the gold core and the biochemical properties of the peptides.

In the past, short peptides have been specifically designed to form self-assembled monolayers on gold nanoparticles. Thus, such approach was described as constituting a potential route towards the preparation of protein-like nanosystems. In other words, peptide-capped gold nanoparticles can be depicted as building-blocks which could potentially be assembled to form artificial protein-like objects using a “bottom-up” approach.

However, the structural characterization of the peptide monolayer at the gold nanoparticles’ surface, essential to envision the design of building-blocks with well-defined secondary structure motifs and properties, is poorly investigated and remains challenging to assess experimentally.

In the pre-printed manuscript, we present a molecular dynamics computational model for peptide-capped gold nanoparticles, which was developed using systems characterized by mean of IR spectroscopy as a benchmark. In particular, we investigated the effect of the peptide capping density and the gold nanoparticle size on the structure of self-assembled monolayers constituted of either CALNN or CFGAILSS peptide.

The computational results were found not only to well-reproduce the experimental ones, but also to provide insights at the molecular level into the monolayer’s structure and organization, e.g., the peptides’ arrangement within secondary structure domains on the gold nanoparticle, which could not have been assessed with experimental techniques.

Overall, we believe that the proposed computational model will not only be used to predict the structure of peptide monolayers on gold nanoparticles, thus helping in the design of bio-nanomaterials with well-defined structural properties, but will also be combined to experimental findings, in order to obtain a compelling understanding of the monolayer’s structure and organization.

In this sense, we would like to stress that, in order to improve data reproducibility, enable further analysis and the use of the proposed computational model for peptide-capped gold nanoparticles, we are making the data and the custom-written software to assemble and analyse the systems publicly available.

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Snapshots of the final structure of the simulated 5 (left) and 10 (right) nm CFGAILSS-capped gold nanoparticle, illustrating different content and organization of secondary structure motifs.

Gold nanorods to shine light on the fate of implanted stem cells

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Joan Comenge

This is a guest post by Joan Comenge

Our work regarding the use of gold nanorods as contrast agents for photoacoustic tracking of stem cells has been just published (or here*). You can find all the technical details of the work there, so I will try to explain here the work for the readers who are not very familiar with our field.

It is important to have the appropriate tools to evaluate safety and efficacy of regenerative medicine therapies in preclinical models before they can be translated to the clinics. This is why there is an interest in developing new imaging technologies that enable real time cell tracking with improved sensitivity and/or resolution. This work is our contribution to this field.

To distinguish therapeutic cells from the patient’s own cells (or here from the mouse’s own cell),  the therapeutic cells have to be labelled before they are implanted. It is well known, that biological tissue is more transparent to some regions of the light spectrum than others. This fact is very easy to try at home (or at your favourite club): if you put your hand under a green light, no light will go through it, whilst doing the same under a red light the result will be very different. That means that red light is less absorbed by our body. Near infrared light is even less absorbed and this is why this region of the spectrum is ideal for in vivo imaging. Therefore, we made our cells to absorb strongly in the near infrared so we can easily distinguish them.

Gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes (synthesis and picture by Joan Comenge).

Gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes (synthesis and picture by Joan Comenge).

To do this, we labelled cells with gold nanoparticles. Interestingly, the way gold nanoparticles interact with light depends on how their electrons oscillate. That means that size and shape of the nanoparticles determine their optical properties, and this is one of the reasons why we love to make different shapes of nanoparticles. In particular, gold nanorods strongly absorb in the near infrared and they are ideal contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

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Figure reproduced from: The production of sound by radiant energy; Science 28 May 1881; DOI: 10.1126/science.os-2.49.242

We have now cells that interact with light in a different way than the tissue. The problem is that light is scattered by tissue, so resolution is rapidly lost as soon as you try to image depths beyond 1 mm. Obviously, this is not the best for in vivo imaging. Luckily for us, Alexander Graham Bell realised 130 years ago that matter emits sounds when is irradiated by a pulsed light. This is known as the photoacoustic effect and it has been exploited recently for bioimaging. Photoacoustic imaging combines the advantages of optical imaging (sensitivity, real-time acquisition, molecular imaging) and the good resolution of ultrasound imaging because ultrasounds (or phonons), contrarily to photons, are not scattered by biological tissue.
GNR-35.2Si3 in cells_16

Silica-coated gold nanorods inside cells

To optimise the performance of our gold nanorods, we coated them with silica. Silica is glass and therefore it protects the gold core without interfering with its optical properties. This protection is required to maintain gold nanorods isolated inside cells since nanorods are entrapped in intracellular vesicles, where they are very packed. The absence of a protective coating ultimately would result in a broader and less intense absorbance band, which would be translated to a less intense photoacoustic signal and consequently a lower sensitivity in cell detection. This of special importance in our system, a photoacoustic imaging system developed by iThera Medical which uses a  multiwavelength excitation to later deconvolute the spectral information of the image to find your components of interest. Thus, narrow absorption bands helps to improve the detection sensitivity even further. With this we demonstrated that we were able to monitor a few thousand nanorods labelled-cells with a very good 3D spatial resolution for 15 days. This allowed for example to see how a cell cluster changed with time, see how it grows or which regions of the cell cluster shows the highest cell density. In addition, this work opens the door to new opportunities such as  multilabelling using gold nanorods of different sizes and consequently different optical properties to observe simultaneously different type of cells. We also believe that not only stem cell therapies, but also other fields that are interested in monitoring cells such as cancer biology or immunology can benefit from the advances described in our work.

You can find the original publication here (or here*).
All the datasets are available via Figshare.

This work was supported by the UK Regenerative Medicine Platform Safety and efficacy, focusing on imaging technologies. Joan Comenge was funded by the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme. The in vivo imaging was done in the Centre for Preclinical Imaging, the Electron Microscopy in the Biomedical EM unit and the Optical Microscopy in the Centre for Cell Imaging.

* the alternative link is to 50 free e-prints; the link will be removed once the paper is fully open access (in a couple of days).

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Cluster of gold nanorod-labelled cells imaged by photoacoustic imaging three days after implantation in mice.

Very hot! But too quick to melt…

No my blog has not been hacked.

Shabir Hassan et al report the “Response of Villin Headpiece-Capped Gold Nanoparticles to Ultrafast Laser Heating” in J Phys Chem B. Nice collaborative work with the group of Peter Hamm at the University of Zurich.

Abstract:

The integrity of a small model protein, the 36-residue villin headpiece HP36, attached to gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is examined, and its response to laser excitation of the AuNPs is investigated. To that end, it is first verified by stationary IR and CD spectroscopy, together with denaturation experiments, that the folded structure of the protein is fully preserved when attached to the AuNP surface. It is then shown by time-resolved IR spectroscopy that the protein does not unfold, even upon the highest pump fluences that lead to local temperature jumps on the order of 1000 K of the phonon system of the AuNPs, since that temperature jump persists for too short a time of a few nanoseconds only to be destructive. Judged from a blue shift of the amide I band, indicating destabilized or a few broken hydrogen bonds, the protein either swells, becomes more unstructured from the termini, or changes its degree of solvation. In any case, it recovers immediately after the excess energy dissipates into the bulk solvent. The process is entirely reversible for millions of laser shots without any indication of aggregation of the protein or the AuNPs and with only a minor fraction of broken protein–AuNP thiol bonds. The work provides important cornerstones in designing laser pulse parameters for maximal heating with protein-capped AuNPs without destroying the capping layer.

Gold nanoparticles for physics, chemistry and biology (book review)

Once upon a time, several hundred years ago, ‘before the nanotechnology era’ …

That’s how all good stories start, isn’t it? Thank you to @chemistryworld for the invitation to review the book (here).
Catherine Louis and Olivier Pluchery
Imperial College Press
2012 | 300pp | £65
ISBN 9781848168060